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Queens Resident Who Allegedly Pushed Man Onto Subway Tracks Charged with Attempted Murder: DA

Ronald Lacey, pictured, and the 21st Street-Queensbridge Station (CC BY-SA 4.0)

Jan. 11, 2022 By Christian Murray

A Queens resident has been charged with attempted murder for allegedly shoving a man onto the subway tracks at the 21st Street-Queensbridge F station in Long Island City last year.

Ronald Lacey, 23, was charged with a five-count complaint Saturday for allegedly pushing a 35-year-old Asian man onto the tracks as a train was approaching. The incident took place at around 7:40 a.m. on May 24, 2021.

The victim, however, survived thanks to a number of good Samaritans who flagged down the train conductor who was able to stop. Meanwhile, other straphangers pulled the man up to safety.

The victim lost consciousness in the incident. He was taken to a nearby hospital with various injuries, including a fractured wrist and a cut that required 14 stitches to close.

“Without provocation, this defendant allegedly shoved a man from the platform of the subway onto the tracks with a train entering the station,” said Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz in a statement. “This could have ended with tragic results if not for the quick action of the good Samaritans.”

Lacey, of Parsons Boulevard in Fresh Meadows, managed to evade authorities until Jan. 7, when he was apprehended. He faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted.

Police initially investigated the attack as a possible hate crime. However, Lacey does not face hate crime charges.

He has been charged with attempted murder in the second degree, assault in the first degree, reckless endangerment in the first degree and harassment in the second degree.

Lacey is in custody and has been ordered to return to court Jan. 12.

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